I was, and am, a child of diaspora. I am someone who, for a while, did not belong anywhere. And I will always be someone who understands the everlasting anguish of not belonging.

former governor-general Adrienne Clarkson in an exclusive excerpt from her 2014 Massey Lectureswhich will be delivered across the country, broadcast on CBC and collected in a book entitled Belonging: The Paradox of Citizenship.


"This is without question the best time to be a girl in history."
Maclean’s cover this week: Teenage girls taking on social stereotypes and a sex-saturated culture. (Ignore them at your peril.) Read more here. 
High-res

"This is without question the best time to be a girl in history."

Maclean’s cover this week: Teenage girls taking on social stereotypes and a sex-saturated culture. (Ignore them at your peril.) Read more here. 

Usually the Polaris winner is incredibly divisive. In the room last night, however, there was no snark. No surprise. Even if people hadn’t yet heard Animism, they knew what they had just seen. They knew the woman who just made that glorious noise deserves something, anything, because it’s rare to encounter art that changes the conversation entirely.

Michael Barclay writes on the 2014 Polaris Music Prize winner, Tanya Tagaq.

"Almost every person, when we show them how they’re influenced, say, “[That] wouldn’t influence me.” They think they’re smarter than a bowl, smarter than a serving spoon. It’s amusing. Even with experts, nutrition experts, they say, “I know better.” But look at data. Show bartenders [that] they serve 30 per cent more liquor in short, wide tumblers than tall highball glasses, they deny it. We all think we’re uniquely unaffected by these things."
- Read more surprising facts on food behaviour in our interview with Cornell University food and brand lab director Brian Wansink. High-res

"Almost every person, when we show them how they’re influenced, say, “[That] wouldn’t influence me.” They think they’re smarter than a bowl, smarter than a serving spoon. It’s amusing. Even with experts, nutrition experts, they say, “I know better.” But look at data. Show bartenders [that] they serve 30 per cent more liquor in short, wide tumblers than tall highball glasses, they deny it. We all think we’re uniquely unaffected by these things."

- Read more surprising facts on food behaviour in our interview with Cornell University food and brand lab director Brian Wansink.

“I was naive. To me, it was little trinkets sold in market stalls, the occasional tusk. But then I realized—it was all connected. That’s when I said, ‘I need to document this as far as I can push it.’ ”

- Photographer Patrick Brown on why he’s driven to document the illegal animal trade. See more images from his new book, ‘Trading to Extinction,’ in our full story.

All photographs by Patrick Brown/Panos Pictures


Who doesn’t love almonds? Salted and roasted with just enough olive oil to make them glisten, they’re a perfect snack. Plus, they’re low in saturated fats, high in fibre and packed with protein. No wonder demand is on the rise—from emerging markets in China to Canada, where we rate as one of the highest per-capita consumers. Once a treat for special occasions, they’re sold at Whole Foods and 7-Eleven, raw or roasted or processed into milks and butters.
But now, a growing movement is asking: Is it nuts to eat almonds? Native to the Middle East and Asia, almonds are today the product of intense monoculture in California’s Central Valley, where more than 80 per cent of the world’s supply is harvested. In the past 10 years alone, the crop has doubled to almost two billion pounds; the landmass devoted to almonds now accounts for nearly 323,700 hectares. Both are being blamed by some environmentalists for contributing to no fewer than three current crises: the killing of huge colonies of honeybees, the deaths in droves of wild salmon, and record-breaking droughts.

Excerpted from our full story, Is it nuts to eat almonds? High-res

Who doesn’t love almonds? Salted and roasted with just enough olive oil to make them glisten, they’re a perfect snack. Plus, they’re low in saturated fats, high in fibre and packed with protein. No wonder demand is on the rise—from emerging markets in China to Canada, where we rate as one of the highest per-capita consumers. Once a treat for special occasions, they’re sold at Whole Foods and 7-Eleven, raw or roasted or processed into milks and butters.

But now, a growing movement is asking: Is it nuts to eat almonds? Native to the Middle East and Asia, almonds are today the product of intense monoculture in California’s Central Valley, where more than 80 per cent of the world’s supply is harvested. In the past 10 years alone, the crop has doubled to almost two billion pounds; the landmass devoted to almonds now accounts for nearly 323,700 hectares. Both are being blamed by some environmentalists for contributing to no fewer than three current crises: the killing of huge colonies of honeybees, the deaths in droves of wild salmon, and record-breaking droughts.

Excerpted from our full story, Is it nuts to eat almonds?