It’s a new day in the neighbourhood all across the Western world. More than 30 per cent of Canadians now say they feel disconnected from their neighbours, while half of Americans admit they don’t know the names of theirs. An Australian sociologist investigating community responses in the wake of the 2011 floods in Queensland found relations in “a precarious balance”; neighbours were hesitant to intrude even in emergencies—leading the scholar to conclude that “we are less likely than ever to know” our neighbours. Quite right, too: A recent poll of 2,000 Britons found a third declaring they couldn’t pick their near neighbours out of a police lineup.
Yet it’s hardly surprising, given how lengthy working days, long commutes and having both parents in the labour force have combined with the way we raise our children to create suburban neighbourhoods that are empty more than half the day, with scarcely a neighbour to encounter, let alone recognize, trust or befriend. But, however powerful the economic and social forces behind the disappearing neighbour—and however positive many of its results—according to reams of new research, the transformation is also poisoning our politics and, quite literally, killing us.

- Excerpted from The end of neighbours. Read the full story at macleans.ca.

Photo illustration by Levi Nicholson. High-res

It’s a new day in the neighbourhood all across the Western world. More than 30 per cent of Canadians now say they feel disconnected from their neighbours, while half of Americans admit they don’t know the names of theirs. An Australian sociologist investigating community responses in the wake of the 2011 floods in Queensland found relations in “a precarious balance”; neighbours were hesitant to intrude even in emergencies—leading the scholar to conclude that “we are less likely than ever to know” our neighbours. Quite right, too: A recent poll of 2,000 Britons found a third declaring they couldn’t pick their near neighbours out of a police lineup.

Yet it’s hardly surprising, given how lengthy working days, long commutes and having both parents in the labour force have combined with the way we raise our children to create suburban neighbourhoods that are empty more than half the day, with scarcely a neighbour to encounter, let alone recognize, trust or befriend. But, however powerful the economic and social forces behind the disappearing neighbour—and however positive many of its results—according to reams of new research, the transformation is also poisoning our politics and, quite literally, killing us.

- Excerpted from The end of neighbours. Read the full story at macleans.ca.

Photo illustration by Levi Nicholson.

Maclean’s has produced a special digital issue on the life and legacy of Robin Williams. The commemorative edition offers a complete look at the star’s wild genius, including a detailed analysis of his career by Jaime J. Weinman; special columns by Paul Wells and Emma Teitel; a collection of Williams’s best on-screen moments; an extensive photo gallery chronicling the comic’s life and times; and the most poignant remembrances from Williams’s family and friends.
The FREE special issue is available for your iPad. Check your Maclean’s app, or follow this link to the App Store. High-res

Maclean’s has produced a special digital issue on the life and legacy of Robin Williams. The commemorative edition offers a complete look at the star’s wild genius, including a detailed analysis of his career by Jaime J. Weinman; special columns by Paul Wells and Emma Teitel; a collection of Williams’s best on-screen moments; an extensive photo gallery chronicling the comic’s life and times; and the most poignant remembrances from Williams’s family and friends.

The FREE special issue is available for your iPad. Check your Maclean’s app, or follow this link to the App Store.

Every year since 1991, the International Labour Organization has published a map of global employment trends, which allows us to see what has actually being going on in the global job market over the past 23 years.
We’ve compiling their annual maps into one GIF, one that shows pretty clearly just how truly global the 2009 recession turned out to be and the slow, uneven recovery that has followed. The darker the country, the higher its unemployment rate that year.
For more context on the numbers, read our full story. High-res

Every year since 1991, the International Labour Organization has published a map of global employment trends, which allows us to see what has actually being going on in the global job market over the past 23 years.

We’ve compiling their annual maps into one GIF, one that shows pretty clearly just how truly global the 2009 recession turned out to be and the slow, uneven recovery that has followed. The darker the country, the higher its unemployment rate that year.

For more context on the numbers, read our full story.

Inside the Canadian Navy’s slow-motion crisis. How aging ships, budget cuts and outdated military priorities are crippling the Canadian Navy. Read here.  High-res

Inside the Canadian Navy’s slow-motion crisis. 
How aging ships, budget cuts and outdated military priorities are crippling the Canadian Navy. Read here